So you want Tangs

So you want Tangs

By Factory Fish Tanks

Tangs are known widely from Finding Nemo; Dory a Blue Tang made them one of the most popular saltwater fish. With millions of eyes and a big variety people often mistake Blue Tangs as their own type but in fact there are over 86 variety of Tangs. From Emperor Tangs to yellow Tangs these fish are saltwater and need a lot more care than the average fish. They need plenty of rock, coral and algae to survive as that is their main diet. They are avid swimmers looping in and about the crevices in the tank. This is why it is extra important to have an over 125 gallon tank for just a single Tang. They on average grow to 8-12" but Lipstick Tangs can grow up to 20 inches! 

 

 

Tangs come in a variety with beautiful patterns like the Emperor Tang to the shiny Silver Tang that shines under every light. These beautiful fish tend to be around 1lb and can live up to 30 years in the wild. They tend to be more sensitive to disease and grow very quick so they are not the easiest fish to keep. The Tangs are a perfect addition to any saltwater reef build. With their bright colors, flashy swimming style, and over all show stoppers; the Tangs are the highlight of most saltwater builds.

 

 

 Don't even think about a Tang if your build is under 100 gallons. Tangs need a lot of coral and rocks to live a happy healthy life. Just like in the ocean these animals stick close the rocks, hiding from predators. When it comes to Tangs we would aim for at least 150 gallons and another 20 gallons per Tang. This will make sure your family of fish are balanced. Adding too many Tangs can be a nightmare from ich and having a quarantine tank makes even more important! When it comes to a 150 gallon build, you are looking between 1.8k for the tank and around 2.8k for a full setup. Contact us for more info on what size tank for your fish group! We are here to help from bio load to choosing filters!

 

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So you want Koi Fish

So you want Koi Fish

By Factory Fish Tanks

For many years Koi fish have been a staple of Japanese culture with centuries of rich history with these magnificent fish. Starting from just carp, farmers began capturing and breeding the most colorful ones they could find. This led to a long history of rice farmers breeding these colorful carp to now being hundreds of thousands of dollars. The most expensive Koi sold for nearly 2 million and often breeders compete in competitions for these serious prizes.

 

 

Koi fish are often regarded as a symbol wealth and loyalty due to their gratefulness in the water and shiny coin like scales. These fish are not an easy fish to take care of either. With their high bioload from things like hand feeding and high fiber foods can easily clog filters. This means you need more space then you think you need for a Koi and this normally means going for a pond. Koi fish are often kept in pond but with the risk of birds, weather, and other animals often times tanks are best to keep them safe. Ponds are hands down the best way to keep a koi family since you can easily fill up to 10,000 gallons without going over 15k setup. When looking at Koi fish, they need a lot of room. Often you need about 250 gallon per fish, so just for two koi you're looking at 500 gallons!

 

Ponds are often better due to price, but when it comes to taking care of your beloved koi a tank keeps them much safer. From wildlife to hot weather the outsides may not be the best place for your $1000 japanese Koi fish. To keep their cold blooded animals safe you're looking for at least 3 feet in depth with some tarp you can cover the pond with. During winter times the pond may freeze fully if it is not deep enough. 

 

 

 

Often times you hear a myth that Koi fish grow to the size of their tank and do not jump but this is farther from the truth. A lot of store bought Koi do not exceed 12" so this is where the myth comes in when kept in a small tank. The fish grow based on their genetics and lineage and you should not expect a 3 footer from the pet store. Not only this but the other factor includes the health, food quality, temperature, overcrowding, & stress on the fish. Overall if you're looking for a healthy koi that you plan on keeping right then get it from a proper breeder and not a petstore. Trust us that extra hundred bucks will give you the peace of mind your fish won't pass away within a year.

 

 

 

Above is an 2400 Gallon Arowana tank so how big of an aquarium do you need for a Koi? Well the answer can vary on how big the fish is, but a good reference is around 500 gallons per fish. Before you run out, this is for a fully grown 24-30 inch Koi fish. A tank setup this size would run you between 8.5k and 14k for a full setup with sump, stand and everything else. A 500 gallon tank is no joke, from maintenance to running but to keep a Koi the right way this is the only way! To keep an average 12" Koi, you're looking closer to 250 gallons which is close to 4k and around 7k for a full setup.

 

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So want an Arowana

So want an Arowana

By Factory Fish Tanks

Arowana are of the most sought after fish with rare ones selling up to $300,000! They are known to bring good luck and prosperity due to their metallic scales that resemble coins. The Asian Arowana variety are illegal to import without proper licensing due to them being endangered. This makes these fish even more enticing and expensive! To get your hands on one of these is impressive, not the start on the size tank needed to house them.

 

 

Silver Arowana are one of the most common Arowana in USA. There is a wide variety from Gold to Black. Arowana are a hard fish to keep and not for everyone due their price and maintenance level. Commonly known as monkey fish due to them being able to jump out of their tank. These fish can range from as low as $100 to $500 for an average Arowana but of course prices can range up to the six figures with these rare fish. 

The proper tank size needed to keep a Silver Arowana around 36" is at-least 8 x 4 x 3 feet. This would be close to 700 gallons. This will give your Arowana plenty of room to not be hurt by sudden movements or lights. The reason these fish need this large of tank is they are large creatures that love to jump. Having a three foot fish is no joke and if you're a serious hobbyist then you will be the first to give your expensive fish extra space to stay healthy. The price can be steep and often a pond is recommended, but even those can be upwards of 8k with professional installation.

 

 

Our price on a tank like this would be dependant on a lot of options but overall a 9x4x3 feet - 700 Gallons would be roughly 14k for just the tank. Including the sump, stand, and shipping your looking close to 19k for a full setup landed in your driveway! Often times you will see recommendations of 250 gallons but this is far from the right size. 8 x 4 x 3 feet is the bare minimum for a fully grown Arowana. Aiming your tank for 3x the fishes length and 1.3x their width means a 1000 gallon tank setup would be the perfect roomy setup for a fully grown Arowana.

When it comes to the smaller 18”- 24” Asian Arowana they will be fine with an 7x3x3 feet tank. A tank this size would be around 400 gallons and would be around 7k for the tank and closer to 10k for a full setup.

 

 

When talking about taking care of a fully grown Arowana it's really not for everyone. From the high cost to getting everything setup. We are here to help answer any question regarding your build. Factory Fish Tanks has been building tanks for over a decade. We have built many Arowana tanks and are confident we are the right fit for your build! 

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